Sampler Block Shuffle – Block 1

Those who have hung around me for a while know that I rarely make a block/pattern like the pattern says to make it. Don’t ask me why because I’m not sure I have an answer. It just seems to me that when I look at a quilt block for example I sometimes see it put together differently than the directions say to put it together. Such was the case with the first block in Moda’s Sampler Block Shuffle. What the directions said to do and what I did to come up with my block are two different things. How so? Well, I’ll show you. WARNING: This turned into somewhat of a tutorial so be prepared to be reading for a while. Here’s a bit of music by one of Victoria’s favorite fellers to enjoy while reading since it seems to go quite well with me doing this block my way.

First, I want to make it perfectly clear that the directions given for the first block, designed by Sandy Gervais, are correct as written, and my sharing here of how I went about making this block is in no way a criticism of the block’s design or designer. I guess you could say I’m just following through on what my mom taught me long ago. She always said that there was more than one way to skin a cat (not that we’d ever actually do that in reality of course), which is probably why my brain saw a totally different way of putting this block together.

If you’ve not already found the patterns they are under the “Free Patterns” tab at the top of the page. The first three patterns are only going to be available for a short time and then they will be replaced by new block patterns. Meaning…go find the patterns, save them, and don’t procrastinate about doing it!

Again, if you’ve known me for a while you know that I hate drawing on fabric. I have no definite answer for why that is, but I just do. For me it’s akin to someone raking their nails across a chalkboard (~shudder!). I will go to great lengths to keep from having to draw on my fabric. That being said, my first change to this design was to use Thangles and make half-square triangles (HST) instead of marking squares to sew on either end of a rectangle. That meant that the strips that I used to make the HST units could also be used to cut solid squares from the background fabric, a white tone-on-tone dot, as well as the dark fabric, which was the red fabric in my block.

Some folks who have never used Thangles think that they’re difficult to use Pic-Blk 1-Thangles Cvrbecause they don’t know which size to work with. Actually, it’s very simple because the finished size of your HST unit is in dark black print on the front of the package and the width of the strip you need to cut is given right underneath it. In this case, I knew the finished block was to be 6” square. Since there are four sections across the block each section had to finish at 1-1/2” square doing it my way. So, I pulled out my 1.5 Thangles and set to work. Another clue in this case as to what size Thangles to use was the size given for the solid squares for the background and Print 2, i.e. 2” squares.
Pic-Blk 1-Components
Once I figured out how many of each HST I needed, I took my Thangles paper, measured it and found that I would need a 2”x6” strip set to make four HST that were red and yellow. I would need a second 2″x6″ strip set to make four HST that were yellow and white. I also needed to allow for the solid squares so I cut a 2”x15” strip from the background fabric, a 2”x15” strip from the red fabric, and a 2”x13” strip of yellow fabric. From those three strips I ended up with all the components for the square.

I’ve used Thangles for a while now because to me it’s like paper-piecing and I Pic-Blk 1-Thangles 1can sew on a line, more or less. Here are a few things that I have learned work best for me. I always use a 50 wt. silk finish thread when piecing. I put the fabric strips right sides together with the lightest colored fabric on top. I pin the Thangles paper in the open triangular spaces to the strip set so that it doesn’t shift while sewing. Instead of sewing right on the broken line I sew just to one side towards the solid line. That means I’m sewing into my seam allowance just a thread orPic-Blk 1-Thangles-Seam Line two in the fabric and allowing for the thickness of my sewing thread. When I fold the HST open, it won’t be too small because I’ve allowed for the thickness of the thread I’m sewing with and for the threads caught up in the seam line. I sew down one broken line, lift my presser foot and pull the unit out a little so that I can flip it and sew down the other broken line without cutting the thread. Hopefully, you can see the thread loops at the sides of the photo to the left. This saves both thread and time. Depending on what size Thangles I’m using I may or may not do the same when moving from one HST section to the next. In this case I repeated this practice so that I didn’t have to cut my thread until I had essentially chain pieced all the sections for one unit and moved on to the next unit.

Now it’s time to cut the HSTs apart. Obviously you’re going to cut on the vertical solid line. What’s not always so obvious, meaning you might need your reading spectacles here, is a very thin white line that is between the other thin solid black lines going across the paper from side to side. You want to cut across that thin white line to separate the sections. The more accurately you do this the more accurate your HST units will turn out.
Pic-Blk 1-Dog Ear B4 Trim
One of the other pluses in my mind when using Thangles is that there’s already one dog ear cut off for you. Yes, that’s another thing I don’t like doing because I’m always afraid I’ll cut it crooked or cut into my seam allowance and compromise accuracy. I’ve found that if you fold back the paper on the seam Pic-Blk 1-Thangles-Dog Ear Trimline, you have a nice guide for cutting of the second dog ear neatly and without cutting into your seam allowance. I place my blade up against the edge of the paper and push down firmly in order cut off the little triangle that’s sticking out to one side. Voila! No more dog ears.

Pic-Blk 1-Squarg UpBefore I tear the paper off I press the triangles, fabric side up. Thangles are printed with a special kind of ink so there’s no need to worry about the ink being transferred to your fabric when heated. The darker fabric will be facing up which means you’ll be pressing to the darker fabric as we most often do. I then take my HST unit to the cutting mat and make sure it’s the size it needs to be, in this case 2” square. I prefer to use a 4-1/2” square ruler for this step. That way I can see all around the edges easily.

Now comes the even funner (yes, that’s a word in my vocabulary) part, laying outPic-Blk 1-Layout all the components of the square. I use a block keeper which has a fuzzy texture to do this as it will keep each piece in place until I’m ready to sew it. If I have to leave for some reason, I can fold the attached clear sheet of plastic over it to protect my layout from intruders in my sewing space be they two legged critters or four legged critters. It has also saved me from sewing the wrong side of the seam or a HST in the wrong direction more than once.

Pic-Blk 1-Pin HSTThe pattern directions have you sewing two squares and a rectangle together to form a unit and doing this four times. Then you sew the four units together as you would a four-patch. I, on the other hand, sewed my components in a row and I did this for four rows. I guess you could equate that to a sixteen-patch. To make sure the points for HSTs turned out all right, I pinned them either side of the seam line. Since the seams are pressed to the dark side they line up without any trouble at all.

Pic-Blk 1-PinningWhen sewing the two rowsPic-Blk 1-Alignment together I wanted to make sure the seams in the first row were pressed in one direction and the seams in the second row were pressed in the opposite direction. To help keep things lined up I pinned on either side of the seam within the 1/4” seam allowance space. If you can do this so that the fold on top is going away from you when you’re sewing then the seams should line up and look great once sewn. I learned this trick by watching Alex Anderson on The Quilt Show. If you’ve not already signed up for this extravaganza of learning you need to do that right after you finish reading this post. Pic-Blk 1-Rows 1 n 2

Another trick I used I also learned on The Quilt Show from a lesson with Jo Morton. Instead of pressing whole seams to the dark, she sometimes snips a seamPic-Blk 1-Cut Seam so that those who want to face towards the right can and those that want to face toward the left can. It makes for a flatter seam and reduces bulk. You just have to be careful and not snip through the seam. It’s an interesting idea and does make things nice and flat as a result. Once I had all four rows sewn together I pressed the joining seams open.

Pic-Blk 1-Finished BlockMy preferred block size is 6″. I like how my block turned out and am pretty sure this is the first time I’ve ever done a block in red and yellow. I just picked up two strips that I had close at hand, you know, those strips I tear off the ends of new bolts to straighten them up. Now I have to decide if I want the rest of my blocks to follow this bright color path or not. What do you think?

GIVEAWAY! If you’d like to make a block just like this one, leave me a comment by Sunday, November 8. I’ll give one person, drawn at random, a sweet sixteen (approx. 9”x11”) of each of the fabrics I used. That way we can match or you can reverse the colors if you like and make your block look totally different. I’d love to see your blocks and Moda would too. You can post them at #modasamplershuffle. I’m guessing that’s an Instagram site. I don’t have one set up for the shop yet but am working on it. I’ll let you know once I’ve got it up and running.

So, start pulling out some scraps and lets have some fun!

Freebie Friday!

It’s been a while since I put together a list of freebies that I find as I cruise around the internet. I’m usually not looking for freebies; they just seem to pop up somehow. I’m not complaining mind you. It’s always nice to find free surprises. Even though we all have more on our to-do lists than we can possibly ever get done it never hurts to have options. The more the merrier I always think. Just click on the underlined words and you should be transported like magic on a wonderful adventure.

Be sure to check out Peck’s Pieces to get the last blocks of the Snowmen in the Pines wallhanging along with Miss Marjory’s newest offering, Chain of Love. If you get crackin’, I bet you can get that one finished for Valentine’s Day.

Do you like mysteries? I do if we’re talking in novel form. I’m not quite so keen on quilt mysteries but couldn’t resist following along with the New Year’s Day 2013 Mystery offered by Sheryl of Quilting Tizzy. All the clues are still there but she won’t leave them up forever. Just click on the link at the top of the page and you’ll find everything you need to get you going.

I’ve been following the Sentiments Sampler by Dawn Heese for Henry Glass Fabrics since October. It is a lovely 12 block sampler set on-point. I wish I could tell you that I have all the fabrics that were used to make that quilt, but I do not. There’s just so much room in the shop and so much room in our budget (yes, we kinda sorta do have one…such as it is). Be sure to save or print all the patterns for the blocks because there’s no guarantee how long they’ll be available.

Bunny Hill Designs is one of my favorites so I was thrilled when Anne posted a pattern for a heart to make on her blog January 5. She didn’t just make one heart she made a bunch of them! Go over and look at the different styles she made and the different ways she displayed them. I’ve got my pattern printed out and have been looking over my fabric options. Decisions, decisions…

January tends to be the month when we make resolutions to do many things. One such thing is oftentimes getting organized. I ran across these free storage labels when looking for something else…imagine that! There are round labels, square labels, and rectangular labels. Laminate them and they’ll last for a very long time. BHG has made the patterns in multiple colors so you could even color-code some things around the house. How clever is that! Thankfully, they give you the correct size of label that you’ll need to purchase if you don’t have them on hand already. So, if you want to organize your pantry, laundry room, sewing room, wherever, you now have the perfect labels for the task.

Speaking of labels, I think I may have shared this link before but couldn’t find it quickly when I went back through older posts so I’ll include it here for your convenience. I’ve had so much fun changing up the clip art on these labels. I made some for Victoria to put on gifts this past Christmas. I used the regular mailing label size template but deleted whatever the little picture was on the left hand side. I then put a harp clip art in that space making unique labels that left no doubt in anyone’s mind who was giving them a gift. I used them for the generic “From: The Andersons” as well as for our local guild since I’m now the secretary and have to mail out the newsletter to some of our members. I have a little mouse sitting on a pink spool of thread on those labels. Too cute! Give these a try. If you prefer unique address labels this is the way to go.

In looking to see whether or not I had given you the last label information or not, I discovered that there were ads at the bottom of my blog pages. Since I rarely read my own blog I didn’t realize these were there. I apologize for them being there and will look into how to get rid of them. I think I probably have to pay WordPress some amount in order to have them removed. Rest assured that I’m not making any money off the ads, but I do believe that they are in an effort to cover the cost of the FREE blog site they offer. Maybe it’s only in our beloved Quiltland that things offered for free really are.

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