I’m a Bit Concerned…

Last year we lost Quilter’s Newsletter Magazine. A publication that was the prototype for all those that have followed. Sadly, it wasn’t the first quilting/sewing related publication to fall off the newsstands in the past few years. AQS has stopped publishing new books, and although they’ve added a fall show in Paducah, they’ve cut others out of their lineup. In the past few years smaller publishers have been bought out by larger ones. Several well-established quilt shops across the nation have closed their doors. Now, we’re losing some of our fabric options as fabric vendors cease operation or are phased out, namely Kona Bay and Red Rooster (see their posting of March 16). Why?

After being told last year by a new-to-me batik vendor that they have to pay for their orders up front, I better understood how challenging, not to mention expensive, it must be to produce fabric. While I rarely cancel an order once I’ve placed it, there have been a couple of times in the past that I felt I had no choice. I have no doubt that other shops may find the need to do so as well from time to time causing the fabric vendor(s) to be “stuck” with excess fabric that they thought was sold. Thankfully, quilt shops are usually given 30 to 60 days to try and sell some of their new fabrics before having to pay for them, but apparently not so for our beloved fabric vendors. It could be that more established vendors might not have to pay the full amount of an order up front, but still. I don’t even want to think of what the bills are for some of the well-established fabric vendors we know and love. Then there are the book vendors, the pattern vendors, the thread vendors, the batting vendors, etc. How are we to help sustain all of these folks in the current economic climate?! Not to mention the current mindset of many quilters (a topic for a future post) based on personal conversations coupled with social media discussions and comments.

“What on earth is going on?” you might be asking. Well, it’s simple really. Ye olde trickle-down effect has gone, or rather has been going, into effect. Quilters aren’t buying as much fabric as they once did, so obviously, quilt shops aren’t buying as much fabric as they once did, at least this shop isn’t. Surely I can’t be the only one out there who has cut back. While I know I’m stating the obvious here, fewer sales to shops, be they online or brick-and-mortar, means less fabric needs to be produced. Fabric groups used to have upwards of 40+ SKUs. One Benartex group several years ago had 72 SKUs! That was a lot of fabric of one type for a shop to add to their inventory for the express purpose of making all the projects for which that line was designed. More recently, some vendors have scaled their offerings back to somewhere between 12 to 20 skus in many cases. This makes it much more feasible for a shop owner to purchase a whole group rather than pick a few pieces from a group hoping all the while that they’ve picked the right few pieces, i.e. those that the customers won’t be able to live without. Vendors ha
More

Advertisements

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 91 other followers