There’s Still Time!

Proj-2015-RudyNeed a really quick and cute project to make before Christmas Day? We have just the thing for you then. This little stuffed reindeer can be made in just a few hours, and you probably already have everything you need on hand.  Is he not the cutest thing?!  And at about 6-1/2″ tall he’s small enough to fit into a little a little basket or on the branches of your tree.

As with most projects I do using someone’s pattern, I don’t follow it to the letter. In this case, rather than using freezer paper to make my template I just made a copy of the pattern and cut the reindeer out on the outside edge of the black line. I placed my fabric with right sides together (or print sides together for those who know there is no wrong side to any piece of fabric as both can be used equally well by those who are willing to do so) and pinned the pattern to my fabric. I then sewed along the edge of the paper pattern, cut away the excess fabric ¼” from the stitching, and snipped the curves so it would lay well once turned inside out. There were a couple of places where I stitched through the pattern, but I was able to pull the edge of the pattern out from under those stitches and can use it again to make more reindeer if I so desire.

I gave my little reindeer button eyes and a ribbon that was a bit narrower than the one specified by the designer. The designer by the way is none other than Miss Anne of Bunny Hill Designs. The little snowman in the mitten that I shared in a previous post is also from Bunny Hill Designs. Yes, you might say we like her designs quite well and have lots of her patterns in the shop. Not all have been made into samples mind, but we do love her work.

Proj-Snowman Candle MatWhile I was stitching my little reindeer by machine, Miss Martha was stitching a candle mat in wool felt by hand. It turned out quite nicely, but I’m not sure I want to hide the snowman’s face in the Proj-Snowman Candle Mat CUmiddle by actually putting a candle on it. It might just have to lie around and decorate instead of making itself useful being what it’s supposed to be.  I mean, look at him, would you want to cover up that cute, cute, cute smiling face?   This mat is a nice size, around 11″ give or take.  It still needs three little buttons going down the front of the center snowman according to the pattern by Penny Lane Primitives… or does it?  Our wool felt is the good kind and comes from National Nonwovens.  We love this product so well that we have close to 50 different colors on the bolt.

We will be making kits for the snowman candle mat and could easily put one together for the reindeer as well if you need it.  Patterns at present are limited, so let me know if you want one, or both.  Since you’re coming down to the wire where making handmade gifts is concerned, a kit will make it much quicker to accomplish your goal of giving nothing store boughten, as the old folks around here use to say.

 

 

New Projects and Giveaway Winner!

First, I’d like to announce the winner of the sweet sixteens set I used to make the first block of Moda’s Sampler Block Shuffle. Now the winner can make one just like mine, or some variation thereof. The winner is…Janet! Congratulations Janet! While I didn’t say you had to use your new fabrics to make this first block, I do hope to see something that you’ve used them in…eventually.

Now, on to our projects. Miss Martha has been keeping herself busy making new samples for the shop. The latest two are both geared to winter which is fast approaching. The first project I’d like to share with you is actually the last of 12 in the With Thy Needle series that we’ve been doing this year. These are made from wool felt, and we do have kits for each month available if you didn’t participate but would like to. Just give me a call and I’ll put a set aside for you.
Pic-December
This last installment showcases a boot which has been filled with holly, greenery, and candy canes. It can hang from a background designed to be changed out each month, made into a wall hanging, or framed. It could also be turned into a small pillow or hung from a wire hanger. At only 8″ square you won’t need much room to display your handiwork once finished.

The second little project is just too cute! Made from wool felt, and measuring around 4″x7″, you can whip this up in no time. Not only is it quick, but it is a very versatile project as well. So, just how versatile is it? Well, let me clue you in.
Pic-BHill-Snowman in Mitten
The original intent is of course as a tree ornament. However, you don’t have to just hang it on a tree because you could just as easily hang it on the door knob of a kitchen or bathroom cabinet, or the knob on a dresser in a child’s bedroom. Anywhere you’d like to put a little color and cute into your décor would work.

Maybe you’re not one to buy lots of presents and have gotten into the habit of buying gift cards instead. Let’s face it, when you have teenagers on your list it’s usually the best way to go these days. If that’s the case, you could make just the mitten and put the gift card inside. That way they get two gifts in one. They can still hang the mitten on the tree to enjoy long after the gift card has been used up. You could even include the date on the back of the cuff or stitch the recipients name to the front of the cuff in the event you make multiple mittens for the same family. You could also include the snowman if you’d like depending on how much time you have to work with and whether or not you think the recipient would appreciate your efforts. A gift card could easily slid in behind him.

The snowman isn’t attached to the mitten. This means that he can be made as a stand alone ornament by attaching a small loop to the back of his head. Better yet, why not make him into a pin that can be worn all winter long on a coat, toboggan, or purse. Snowmen can be displayed and enjoyed for several months you know.

Maybe you have smaller folks for which to make gifts. This little snowman would make a great finger puppet by leaving the bottom open. With a little imagination you could make a whole snowman family. Make two snowmen the size given in the pattern for a mom and a dad and then shrink the pattern just a bit and make a brother and sister, or maybe one for each member of the family that you gift the puppets to depending on the family’s configuration. What better way to foster a child’s imagination than with finger puppets?

We have a couple of kits ready to go with plans on making more as soon as we get more patterns. If you think you need help making this project, we can set up a time for you to work one-on-one with Miss Martha at no extra charge. While this project is something you could do in an evening or two, especially with all the fabrics on hand, you don’t want to wait too long to get started. I mean, who’d of thought it would be November already!? That means December is fast approaching and will be here before we’re ready. I know that for a fact because it always does. Agreed?

Another Cute Spider!

Oct Spider
We’ve never celebrated Halloween as a family. No, our poor, poor deprived children never went trick-or-treating, but they also never lacked for candy because I would go the day after and buy candy I knew they actually liked for half price. They had a lot more candy and it was all eaten as opposed to being thrown away. Of course, since we homeschooled, our children could dress up any day of the year that they liked. They didn’t need a special holiday for that either. Personally, I think they came out much better than their peers in the long run.

When you own a quilt shop you don’t always have the luxury of skipping some holidays. That’s because we sometimes pick a set of patterns by a designer who likes holidays that we the owners might not put too much emphasis on, if any. Because of that, you invariably end up with a project that has icons of a holiday that you’re not keen on. Such is usually the case with Halloween and Christmas especially.

This year we did Buttermilk Basin’s With Thy Needle series when Miss Martha came back to work in February. While the designer used wool for these 8” square projects, we used the much less costly wool felt. After all, we have 50 colors from which to choose. Anyhow, Miss Martha took off like a shot with these little projects and we found it difficult to keep up with her. You’d think she missed stitching while she was retired for one year. She should be finishing up the projects for the last two months here before long. In truth, it’s been a joint effort between her and Victoria, with Victoria packing the kits and doing some of the embroidery work while Miss Martha stitched down all the big pieces.
With Thy Needle Base
The base pattern for this group gives you three alternatives for displaying your handwork. You can frame it in a wooden frame, stitch it into the center of a wall hanging, or make a hanging that allows you to change out the project each month while also keeping track of your needles, pins, and scissors. My plans were to do the latter because I liked the idea of hang the larger piece from a yardstick. Notice that I said “plans”. I’m sure you’re not surprised when I tell you that I’ve not made the background that these projects are supposed to hang on yet. No, I knew you wouldn’t be.
With Thy Needle-Oct
The project for October has a jack-o-lantern wearing a witch’s hat. While we don’t push either of these symbols we can’t dictate what others choose to do. After some debating, we went ahead and made the project as it was designed. Well, we sort of made the project as it was designed. I thought that there should be more light shinning through, so our pumpkin’s eyes and mouth are reversed and have more yellow than black. The kits are packed so that you could do whichever way you prefer. After all, flexibility is a good thing when it comes to stitching. I do have to admit to liking the little spider hanging from the hat though, along with his web in the corner. Being a crazy quilt fanatic I relate those two things with good luck, which I need heaps of these days. It appears our spider has lost a couple of his legs though, so some of his luck may have run out. I sense a fix in the near future.
With Thy Needle-Oct
This is how our version turned out. Didn’t they do a great job!

Even though this series is quickly coming to an end, we do have some kits left if you’d like to claim a set for yourself and get started. Miss Martha is especially pleased with the colors of the one for November and should be bringing the one for December in soon. I’ll try to remember to post those as well, but in the event that I forget, or find something else to post, you’ll just have to come in and see them in person. Trust me, they’re much better in person than they are in a photo.

Spindly Spider Pincushion

SNT-2015 Spider w Bent LegsNow that our fall Stitchin’ Camp has come and gone, I can share with you what we made for our campers. Is this not the cutest thang!!! The number for their door prize was pinned to a spider like this one. After their name was called they picked a spider out of a large box with a sea of spiders in it. Based on the number pinned to their spider, a number that was folded up so it couldn’t be seen, they were given the prize that matched that number. That way, no one could accuse us of playing favorites and giving one camper a better prize than another. The prize they took home was based on the luck of the draw. Speaking of which, on the bottom of one spider, with the number 13 pinned to it, was a tiny red hourglass stitched on the belly. The camper that picked that spider got an extra prize!

As you might guess, plans for camp always start months ahead of time. So, when I ran across a pattern by Elaine Walsh that was in the Fall 2011 issue of Simple Quilts & Sewing I knew our campers would love them. Of course, being the rebels that we are we didn’t follow the pattern exactly. Heaven forbid! We just used it as an inspiration and made a couple of changes so our spiders could stand on their own eight legs.

As always, the making of the spiders was a team effort. I did the majority of the cutting out while Victoria sewed the majority of the spiders together. After I realized she could make two spiders to my one it was a no brainer on my part to let her do them all. Yes, bless her heart, she stitched and stuffed 23 of the 25 spiders that we made.

The original pattern called for baby rickrack for the legs. While I had that item in stock, Victoria suggested pipe cleaners, better known as chenille stems these days. Since we decided to change out the legs we had to change out the fabric for the body because I SNT-2015-Spider Equiptdidn’t want to sew over the metal parts of the legs and then try to turn the spider inside out as instructed in the pattern using the rickrack for legs. We opted for black wool felt for the bodies. Rather than cutting out the body pattern given on the pattern sheet, I used a lid from a candle that I had on hand that was just about the same size. Given there was no seam allowance needed when using the wool felt, I figured the resulting spider would be about the same size. I used a white marking pencil to draw around the lid on a folded piece of wool felt which meant I could cut the top and the bottom of the spider at the same time. I cut the strip about 3-3/4” wide, and from one width (approx. 36”) I got five complete spider bodies.

I traced the eye pattern on a scrap piece of Transfer-Eze, cut on the drawn line, peeled off the paper backing, and stuck the sticky film to a scrap of white wool felt. Then I cut out the white of the eye. This became our eye pattern and was used to cut out eyes for all 25 spiders, times two. I just noticed that I don’t have the original eye that I used to cut out all the others, so one of our campers must have a spider with an eyeball that has Transfer-Eze on the back. That’s OK though, it won’t hurt anything.

Before sewing the spider together we placed a teeny weeny (3/16”) black button from Hillcreek Designs in the center, more or less, of a white eye. Then we stitched that unit, times two, to one of the black circles to make the top of the spider. The bottom circle was added and the two pieces were buttonhole stitched in order to keep them together. Before getting too far around though, the legs, which were cut to 8”, were added one at a time. This made it easier to stitch around one side than it did around the other. That’s because by the time you get to the other side of the body you have all four legs to deal with at one time. Yes, that’s a bit tricky so take your time if you decide to make these yourself. Also, if you need a smaller or larger spider just find a circle the size you need, i.e. saucer, drinking glass, spray starch can, etc. You can easily have a whole army of spiders in various sizes. You can have mommy spiders, daddy spiders, baby spiders…you get the picture.

Of course, it should go without saying that you have to leave a hole in order to stuff the spider to, in this case, make it pincushion worthy. We used Poly-Fil and tried to stuff it fairly tightly. This helps to hold the legs in place, but they can still slide from side to side, so if you let a child play with these do keep an eye on them as the legs might come out all together. Tightly stuffing your spider also helps to keep the pins from pushing through and out the bottom. Don’t get me wrong, they’ll still poke through if you push them hard enough so be careful when picking up your spider once he has pins in place. That’s when picking him up by the legs would be a good idea. By the way, in case you don’t already have Poly-Fil on hand, we do carry a small 2 ounce bag in the event you only want to make a few spiders and don’t want to buy a huge bag and have to find somewhere to store it.
SNT-2015 Splatted Spider
Once made, your spider will look like this. No, one leg isn’t longer than the others, it’s just an optical illusion. Rick said the first one he saw looked like a splatted spider, and after he said that I could see why he’d think so. We had other designs in mind for our spiders though. We wanted them to stand up, so we bent the legs in two places (refer back to first photo). You could bend them only once if you prefer. After all, it’s your spider and you can make his/her legs do whatever you want them to do. You could even add a little bow to one side of the eyes in order to differentiate your girl spiders from your boy spiders. We didn’t do that though because time was a bit of an issue. Yes, even though I found the pattern a while back, as in a couple of months ago at least, we didn’t make the spiders until a few days before camp began. I know, I know. I don’t set a very good example for my daughter where getting things done ahead of time is concerned. I do set a great example though of waiting ‘till the last minute and pushing, I mean persevering, to get things finished. Does that count for anything? Anything at all…? I mean, surely that life skill will come in handy one of these days when she’s handed a project that needs doing in a hurry. Won’t it?

Speaking of projects, Victoria will be helping in the decorating of the dance studio this year for fall. Instead of using these as pincushions, she will be taking a few of our spiders to the dance studio to use as decorations. She might even hang one or two from the ceiling all tangled up in that white fluff stuff that’s supposed to look like spider webs. We ended up with four extra spiders that she can use. There should have been five extras, but we had to give Miss Martha one. Yes, we HAD to give Miss Martha one because she whined about wanting one. I know…if you know Miss Martha you’re not surprised one little bit to hear that.

All in all I think our campers liked their little spiders. Hopefully, every time they use it they’ll think of all the fun they had at camp and endeavour to join us again at a future camp. I’ve said it before but have to say it again. I have an awesome group of ladies who come together for camp. They’re not always the same ones, although many don’t miss a camp if they can help it, but they’re all awesome. I cannot brag on them enough! Not only are they patient with me when I’m slow in getting information out to them on camp, but they’re always helpful and willing to teach a newer quilter in my absence. They get so much accomplished during our three day camp that I’m getting more and more tempted to close the shop and join them. Who knows, maybe one day I will!

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 91 other followers